Six wonderful winter beach walks

20/11/16

Wrap up warm and head out into the fresh air. We've put together a list of our Facebook fans' favourite bracing winter beach walks from tucked-away coves to spectacular stretches of sand - all with plenty of places to stop for a drink afterwards.

Walk 2

Plemont

This beautiful cove on the north coast has to be one of Jersey's most beautiful beaches. It's a picture in the winter too, when low tide exposes a pristine sandy beach with rock pools to splash in and caves to explore. There's a long flight of steps down to the sand but it's worth it (and there's a superb beach café at the top when you're done with rock pooling).

Walk1
Archirondel to St Catherine's Breakwater

Secluded beaches, wooded valleys and beach cafes - this coastal stroll around Jersey's north eastern corner is a popular winter walk. Look out for the red and white garrison tower overlooking Archirondel's pebbly beach, it was built in 1792 for artillery soldiers, and you can even stay there. 

Although please note that Archirondel Tower will be closed from 17 September 2016 for bookings until Spring 2017. Jersey Heritage has been able to invest in this iconic tower and renovate it to a full self-catering property.

New for Spring 2017, Archirondel Tower will accommodate up to four people with a fully-equipped kitchen, shower room with toilet facilities, bedroom and comfortable living room. The renovation will also include roof access with unrivalled views across the east coast of Jersey including St Catherine’s break water. Click for more information about Jersey Heritage.

Make a stop: Choose between the beach café at Archirondel, or the Breakwater Café at St Catherine's.

Walk3

Ouaisne to St Brelade's Church

Choose between a low tide stroll along the sandy swathe of St Brelade's Bay at low tide, or walk along the wall and climb up through the trees for a panoramic view of the beach. Don't forget to take a look at St Brelade's church and the 12th century Fishermens' Chapel. The church was built from local beach stone (you can still see limpet shells on some of the stones).

Make a stop: You're spoilt for choice with cafés and restaurants galore along the way, including our own L'Horizon Beach Hotel & Spa, but for an atmospheric winter escape, head to the Old Smuggler's Inn at Ouaisne for a post-walk pint in a pub that's full of character.

Walk4

St Helier to St Aubin

There's something nice about arriving at the pretty village of St Aubin via the scenic route. At low tide, the sea retreats to leave a wide expanse of beach that you can walk across instead of using the seafront promenade. Plenty of cafés, pubs and restaurants make St Aubin's village a good destination to head to, and there's a regular bus service back to town if your feet are tired.

Make a stop: The Gunsite Café on the promenade is two-thirds of the way around the bay, and St Aubin's is home to plenty of popular cafés including Murray's for excellent coffee, and The Boat House for a harbour-view lunch stop.

 Walk5

St Ouen's Bay

Miles of sand and Atlantic surf make this beach a popular spot to wrap up warm and take a winter stroll with the iconic Rocco tower in the distance. If it's too blustery, head inland and explore the sand dunes and nature reserves - St Ouen's is a conservation area of outstanding natural beauty.

Make a stop: There are plenty of surfer-style beach cafés along the bay to choose from - like the charming La Braye Café and the contemporary El Tico to name just a few.

Walk6

Portelet

You'll need plenty of energy - there are a fair few steps down to this secluded bay, but it's a pretty spot for a winter walk. The beach centres around an islet with a tower, known as 'Janvrin's Tomb' as it's where a sea captain was buried after dying of the plague aboard his ship.

Make a stop: After all those steps you'll be feeling thirsty. Thankfully Portelet Inn at the top of the steps is well placed for a pint - this 17th century family pub is one of the oldest in the island.

And a word of caution. Jersey has one of the largest tidal ranges in the world, so do take care when walking at low tide. 

Images reproduced courtesy of Danny Evans Photography

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